Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.

Login with Facebook

Forgot Password? Reset your password

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login (Shibboleth)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Table of Contents
Vol. 3, No. 2, 2011
Issue release date: February 2011
Section title: Research Article
Free Access
J Innate Immun 2011;3:150–166

Activation of Pulmonary Dendritic Cells and Th2-Type Inflammatory Responses on Instillation of Engineered, Environmental Diesel Emission Source or Ambient Air Pollutant Particles in vivo

Bezemer G.F.G.a · Bauer S.M.b · Oberdörster G.c, e · Breysse P.N.f · Pieters R.H.H.a · Georas S.N.b, d, e · Williams M.A.b, d, e
aImmunotoxicology Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; bDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, cDivision of Respiratory Biology and Toxicology, dLung Biology and Disease Program, eDepartment of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, N.Y., and fDepartment of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Md., USA
email Corresponding Author

Dr. Marc Adrian Williams

NHEERL, Environmental Public Health Division, Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch, Office of Research and Development

US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (USA)

Tel. +1 919 541 2255, E-Mail Williams.marc@epa.gov

Do you have an account?

Login Information

Contact Information

I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.


The biological effects of acute particulate air pollution exposure in host innate immunity remain obscure and have relied largely on in vitro models. We hypothesized that single acute exposure to ambient or engineered particulate matter (PM) in the absence of other secondary stimuli would activate lung dendritic cells (DC) in vivo and provide information on the early immunological events of PM exposure and DC activation in a mouse model naïve to prior PM exposure. Activation of purified lung DC was studied following oropharyngeal instillation of ambient particulate matter (APM). We compared the effects of APM exposure with that of diesel-enriched PM (DEP), carbon black particles (CBP) and silver nanoparticles (AgP). We found that PM species induced variable cellular infiltration in the lungs and only APM exposure induced eosinophilic infiltration. Both APM and DEP activated pulmonary DC and promoted a Th2-type cytokine response from naïve CD4+ T cells ex vivo. Cultures of primary peribronchial lymph node cells from mice exposed to APM and DEP also displayed a Th2-type immune response ex vivo. We conclude that exposure of the lower airway to various PM species induces differential immunological responses and immunomodulation of DC subsets. Environmental APM and DEP activated DC in vivo and provoked a Th2 response ex vivo. By contrast, CBP and AgP induced altered lung tissue barrier integrity but failed to stimulate CD4+ T cells as effectively. Our work suggests that respirable pollutants activate the innate immune response with enhanced DC activation, pulmonary inflammation and Th2-immune responsiveness.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Research Article

Received: August 16, 2010
Accepted: October 06, 2010
Published online: November 23, 2010
Issue release date: February 2011

Number of Print Pages: 17
Number of Figures: 7
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1662-811X (Print)
eISSN: 1662-8128 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/JIN

Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.