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Table of Contents
Vol. 20, No. 3, 2011
Issue release date: March 2011
Section title: Original Paper

Open Access Gateway

Med Princ Pract 2011;20:231–236

In vivo Antinociceptive and Anti-inflammatory Activities of Dried and Fermented Processed Virgin Coconut Oil

Zakaria Z.A.a, b · Somchit M.N.a · Mat Jais A.M.a · Teh L.K.b · Salleh M.Z.b · Long K.c
aDepartment of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, bPharmacogenomics Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Puncak Alam, and cBiotechnology Research Centre, Malaysian Agriculture Research Institute, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
email Corresponding Author

Dr. Zainul Amiruddin Zakaria

Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences

Universiti Putra Malaysia

43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

Tel. +60 3 8947 2654, Fax +60 3 8943 6178, E-Mail dr_zaz@yahoo.com

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Objective: The present study was carried out to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of virgin coconut oil (VCO) produced by theMalaysian Agriculture Research and Development Institute (MARDI) using various in vivo models. Materials and Methods: Two types of VCOs, produced via standard drying (VCOA) and fermentation (VCOB) processes were used in this study. Both VCOA and VCOB were serially diluted using 1% Tween 80 to concentrations (v/v) of 10, 50 and 100%. Antinociceptive and anti- inflammatory activities of both VCOs were examined using various in vivomodel systems. The antinociceptive activity of the VCOs were compared to those of 1% Tween 80 (used as a negative control), morphine (5 mg/kg) and/or acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg). Results: Both VCOA and VCOB exhibited significant (p < 0.05) dose-dependent antinociceptive activity in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Both VCOs also exerted significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin and hot-plate tests. Interestingly, the VCOs exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in an acute (carrageenan-induced paw edema test), but not in a chronic (cotton-pellet-induced granuloma test) model of inflammation. Conclusion: The MARDI-produced VCOs possessed antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. Further studies are needed to confirm these observations.

© 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: March 05, 2010
Accepted: October 13, 2010
Published online: March 29, 2011
Issue release date: March 2011

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1011-7571 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0151 (Online)

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