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Contribution on Cannabinoids

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Topical and Systemic Cannabidiol Improves Trinitrobenzene Sulfonic Acid Colitis in Mice

Schicho R.a · Storr M.b

Author affiliations

aInstitute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; bDepartment of Medicine II, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany

Corresponding Author

Rudolf Schicho, PhD

Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Graz

Universitätsplatz 4

AT–8010 Graz (Austria)

Tel. +43 31 6380 7851, E-Mail rudolf.schicho@medunigraz.at

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Pharmacology 2012;89:149–155

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Abstract

Background/Aims: Compounds of Cannabis sativa are known to exert anti-inflammatory properties, some of them without inducing psychotropic side effects. Cannabidiol (CBD) is such a side effect-free phytocannabinoid that improves chemically induced colitis in rodents when given intraperitoneally. Here, we tested the possibility whether rectal and oral application of CBD would also ameliorate colonic inflammation, as these routes of application may represent a more appropriate way for delivering drugs in human colitis. Methods: Colitis was induced in CD1 mice by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Individual groups were either treated with CBD intraperitoneally (10 mg/kg), orally (20 mg/kg) or intrarectally (20 mg/kg). Colitis was evaluated by macroscopic scoring, histopathology and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. Results: Intraperitoneal treatment of mice with CBD led to improvement of colonic inflammation. Intrarectal treatment with CBD also led to a significant improvement of disease parameters and to a decrease in MPO activity while oral treatment, using the same dose as per rectum, had no ameliorating effect on colitis. Conclusion: The data of this study indicate that in addition to intraperitoneal application, intrarectal delivery of cannabinoids may represent a useful therapeutic administration route for the treatment of colonic inflammation.

© 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Contribution on Cannabinoids

Received: January 13, 2012
Accepted: January 18, 2012
Published online: March 12, 2012
Issue release date: April 2012

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0031-7012 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0313 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/PHA


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