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Original Report: Patient-Oriented, Translational Research

Myeloperoxidase Levels and Its Product 3-Chlorotyrosine Predict Chronic Kidney Disease Severity and Associated Coronary Artery Disease

Afshinnia F.a, b · Zeng L.a · Byun J.a · Gadegbeku C.A.b, c · Magnone M.C.d · Whatling C.d · Valastro B.d · Kretzler M.a, b · Pennathur S.a, b · Michigan Kidney Translational Core CPROBE Investigator Group

Author affiliations

aUniversity of Michigan, Department of Internal Medicine-Nephrology, and bUniversity of Michigan, Michigan Kidney Translational Core Center, Ann Arbor, MI, and cTemple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; dCardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden

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Am J Nephrol 2017;46:73-81

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Report: Patient-Oriented, Translational Research

Received: February 10, 2017
Accepted: March 09, 2017
Published online: July 01, 2017
Issue release date: July 2017

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0250-8095 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9670 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/AJN

Abstract

Background: The role of myeloperoxidase in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its association with coronary artery disease (CAD) is controversial. In this study, we compared myeloperoxidase and protein-bound 3-chlorotyrosine (ClY) levels in subjects with varying degrees of CKD and tested their associations with CAD. Methods: From Clinical Phenotyping Resource and Biobank Core, 111 patients were selected from CKD stages 1 to 5. Plasma myeloperoxidase level was measured using enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay. Plasma protein-bound 3-ClY, a specific product of hypochlorous acid generated by myeloperoxidase was measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results: We selected 29, 20, 24, 22, and 16 patients from stages 1 to 5 CKD, respectively. In a sex-adjusted general linear model, mean ± SD of myeloperoxidase levels decreased from 18.1 ± 12.3 pmol in stage 1 to 10.9 ± 4.7 pmol in stage 5 (p = 0.011). In patients with and without CAD, the levels were 19.1 ± 10.1 and 14.8 ± 8.7 pmol (p = 0.036). There was an increase in 3-ClY mean from 0.81 ± 0.36 mmol/mol-tyrosine in stage 1 to 1.42 ± 0.41 mmol/mol-tyrosine in stage 5 (p < 0.001). The mean 3-ClY levels in patients with and without CAD were 1.25 ± 0.44 and 1.04 ± 0.42 mmol/mol-tyrosine (p = 0.023), respectively. C-statistic of ClY when added to myeloperoxidase level to predict CKD stage 5 was 0.86, compared to 0.79 for the myeloperoxidase level alone (p = 0.0097). Conclusion: The myeloperoxidase levels decrease from stages 1 to 5, whereas activity increases. In contrast, both myeloperoxidase and ClY levels rise in the presence of CAD at various stages of CKD. Measuring both plasma myeloperoxidase and 3-CLY levels provide added value to determine the burden of myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

© 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Report: Patient-Oriented, Translational Research

Received: February 10, 2017
Accepted: March 09, 2017
Published online: July 01, 2017
Issue release date: July 2017

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0250-8095 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9670 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/AJN


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