Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Original Article

Impact of Methodological Choices on Assessments of the Reliability of Fossil Primate Phylogenetic Hypotheses

Nadal-Roberts M.a · Collard M.b, c

Author affiliations

a Department of Philosophy and Laboratory of Human Systematics, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain;b Department of Anthropology andSociology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada;c AHRB Centre for the Evolutionary Analysis of Cultural Behaviour, University College London, London, UK

Related Articles for ""

Folia Primatol 2005;76:207–221

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: June 11, 2004
Accepted: February 10, 2005
Published online: July 15, 2005
Issue release date: July 2005

Number of Print Pages: 15
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR

Abstract

It has been argued in several recent studies that conventional craniodental characters cannot be assumed to be reliable for the purposes of reconstructing primate phylogenetic relationships and that as a consequence little confidence can be invested in published fossil primate phylogenies. Here, we evaluate this claim by revisiting the analyses reported in one of these studies [Collard and Wood, 2000]. Specifically, we investigate whether the use of alternative methodological procedures would have altered their findings. We focus on three key issues: (1) size correction, (2) outgroup composition and (3) non-phylogenetic correlation among characters. Our analyses suggest that the results of Collard and Wood [2000] were not affected by the size correction method they used or by the outgroup they employed. Our analyses also suggest that their results were not affected by their decision to ignore developmental, functional and other non-phylogenetic correlations among the characters in their data sets. Accordingly, our study supports the assertion that conventional craniodental characters cannot be assumed to be reliable for reconstructing primate phylogenetic relationships. This in turn suggests that many published fossil primate phylogenies may be unreliable.


References

  1. Aiello LC (1992). Allometry and the analysis of size and shape in human evolution. Journal of Human Evolution 22: 127–147.
    External Resources
  2. Agustí J, Kohler M, Moyà‐Solà S, Cabrera L, Garcés M, Parés JM (1996). Can Llobateres: The pattern and timing of the Vallesian hominoid radiation reconsidered. Journal of Human Evolution 31: 143–155.
    External Resources
  3. Cartmill M (1994a). A critique of homology as a morphological concept. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 94: 115–123.
  4. Cartmill M (1994b). Anatomy, antinomies, and the problem of anthropoid origins. In Anthropoid Origins (Fleagle JG, Kay RF, eds.), pp 549–566. New York, Plenum Press.
  5. Chamberlain AT (1987). A Taxonomic Review and Phylogenetic Analysis of Homo habilis. PhD thesis, University of Liverpool.
  6. Collard M, O’Higgins P (2002). Ontogeny and homoplasy in the papionin monkey face. Evolution and Development 3: 322–331.
  7. Collard M, Wood BA (2000). How reliable are human phylogenetic hypotheses? Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 97: 5003–5006.
  8. Collard M, Wood BA (2001). Reliability of craniodental evidence in fossil catarrhine phylogenetics. In Phylogeny of Neogene European Hominoid Primates (de Bonis L, Koufous G, Andrews P, eds.), pp 118–150. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
  9. Creel N (1986). Size and phylogeny in hominoid primates. Systematic Zoology 35: 81–99.
    External Resources
  10. Deinard A, Kidd K (1999). Evolution of a HOXB6 intergenic region within the great apes and humans. Journal of Human Evolution 36: 687–703.
  11. Deinard A, Sirugo G, Kidd K (1998). Hominoid phylogeny: Inferences from a subterminal minisatellite analyzed by repeat expansion detection (RED). Journal of Human Evolution 35: 313–317.
  12. Falsetti AB, Jungers WL, Cole TM III (1993). Morphometrics of the callitrichid forelimb: A case study in size and shape. International Journal of Primatology 14: 551–572.
    External Resources
  13. Hartman SE (1988). A cladistic analysis of hominoid molars. Journal of Human Evolution 17: 489–502.
    External Resources
  14. Hillis DM, Bull JJ (1993). An empirical test of bootstrapping as a method for assessing confidence in phylogenetic analysis. Systematic Biology 42: 182–192.
    External Resources
  15. Jolly CJ (2001). A proper study for mankind: Analogies from the papionin monkeys and their implications for human evolution. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 44: 177–204.
    External Resources
  16. Jungers WL, Falsetti AB, Wall CE (1995). Shape, relative size, and size‐adjustments in morphometrics. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 38: 137–161.
    External Resources
  17. Lieberman DE (1995). Testing hypotheses about recent human evolution from skulls: Integrating morphology, function, development, and phylogeny. Current Anthropology 36: 159–197.
    External Resources
  18. Lieberman DE (1997). Making behavioral and phylogenetic inferences from hominid fossils: Considering the developmental influence of mechanical forces. Annual Review of Anthropology 26: 185–210.
    External Resources
  19. Lieberman DE (1999). Homology and hominid phylogeny: Problems and potential solutions. Evolutionary Anthropology 7: 142–151.
    External Resources
  20. Lieberman DE (2000). Ontogeny, homology, and phylogeny in the hominid craniofacial skeleton: The problem of the browridge. In Development, Growth and Evolution: Implications for the Study of the Hominid Skeleton (O’Higgins P, Cohn MJ, eds.), pp 85–122. London, Academic Press.
  21. Lieberman DE, Wood BA, Pilbeam DR (1996). Homoplasy and early Homo: An analysis of the evolutionary relationships of H. habilis sensu stricto and H. rudolfensis. Journal of Human Evolution 30: 97–120.
    External Resources
  22. Lockwood CA, Kimbel WH, Lynch JM (2004). Morphometrics and hominoid phylogeny: Support for a chimpanzee‐human clade and differentiation among great ape subspecies. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 101: 4356–4360.
  23. Martin RD (1993). Allometric aspects of skull morphology in Theropithecus. In Theropithecus: The Rise and Fall of a Primate Genus (Jablonski NG, ed.), pp 273–298. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
  24. Masters JC, Brothers DJ (2002). Lack of congruence between morphological and molecular data in reconstructing the phylogeny of the Galagonidae. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 117: 79–93.
  25. McCollum MA, Sharpe PT (2001). Developmental genetics and early hominid craniodental evolution. Bioessays 23: 481–493.
  26. Miller E (2003). Review of De Bonis L, Koufous G, Andrews P (eds.) (2001) Hominid Evolution and Climate Change in Europe: Phylogeny of the Neogene Hominid Primates of Eurasia, volume 2. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 121: 390–391.
    External Resources
  27. Mosimann JE (1970). Size allometry: Size and shape variables with characteristics of the log normal and generalized gamma distributions. Journal of the American Statistical Association 65: 930–945.
    External Resources
  28. Pilbeam DR (1996). Genetic and morphological records of the Hominoidea and hominid origins. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 5: 155–168.
  29. Rae T (2002). Review of De Bonis L, Koufous G, Andrews P (eds.) (2001) Hominid Evolution and Climate Change in Europe: Phylogeny of the Neogene Hominid Primates of Eurasia, volume 2. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 8: 590–591.
    External Resources
  30. Ruvolo M (1997). Molecular phylogeny of the hominoids: Inferences from multiple independent DNA data sets. Molecular Biology and Evolution 14: 248–265.
  31. Shi J, Xi H, Wang Y, Zhang C, Jiang Z, Zhang K, Shen Y, Jin L, Zhang K, Yuan W, Wang Y, Lin J, Hua Q, Wang F, Xu S, Ren S, Xu S, Zhao G, Chen Z, Jin L, Huang W (2003). Divergence of the genes on human chromosome 21 between human and other hominoids and variation of substitution rates among transcription units. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 100: 8331–8336.
  32. Singleton M (1996). Quantitative character coding in hominoid phylogeny reconstruction. Poster presented at the 66th annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropology, 2–5 April 1996, St. Louis, Mo.
  33. Swofford DL (1998). PAUP*: Phylogenetic Analysis Using Parsimony (* and other methods) Version 4.0. Sunderland, Sinauer Associates.
  34. Thorpe RS (1984). Coding morphometric characters for constructing distance Wagner networks. Evolution 38: 244–255.
    External Resources
  35. Turner A, Wood BA (1993). Comparative palaeontological context for the evolution of the early hominid masticatory system. Journal of Human Evolution 24: 301–318.
    External Resources
  36. Wildman DE, Uddin M, Liu G, Grossman LI, Goodman M (2003). Implications of natural selection in shaping 99.4% nonsynonymous DNA identity between humans and chimpanzees: Enlarging genus Homo. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 100: 7181–7188.
  37. Wood BA (1988). Are the ‘robust’ australopithecines a monophyletic group? In Evolutionary History of the ‘Robust’ Australopithecines (Grine FE, ed.), pp 269–284. New York, Aldine de Gruyter.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: June 11, 2004
Accepted: February 10, 2005
Published online: July 15, 2005
Issue release date: July 2005

Number of Print Pages: 15
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.